Quack ‘o’ Rama on display now at the Heritage Research Center

        The Heritage Research Center is pleased to announce the opening of Quack ‘o’ Rama: A Collection of Questionable Medical Devices, a solo exhibition of quackery devices collected by the late LLU professor, William T. Jarvis, Ph.D. Selected items are now on display in the lobby of the Heritage Research Center located within the Vernier Radcliffe wing of the Del E. Webb Memorial Library, across the breezeway from Magan Hall.

         It is shocking to believe that anyone would take these medical devices seriously. In decades past, a combination of scientific ignorance and hope for a magical cure-all allowed quack gadgets to thrive. In these modern times, a look at late-night infomercials on television shows medical quackery is still going strong. Consumers can even find quack gadgets on the “As seen on TV” shelves of their favorite retail chain stores. Quack ‘o’ Rama exhibits a selection of both handheld and large, cumbersome devices developed during the 1910 – 1950s used to fool and rob the consumer. Items on display include, the Radium Ore Revigator, a ceramic water crock lined with radioactive materials. This was marketed as a simple means to prevent illnesses including arthritis, flatulence, and senility. Also on display is the Ultra Violet Ray device which claimed to treat acne, alcohol and drug abuse, arthritis and cancer. Other items include antique medicine bottles, a sunlamp from the Battle Creek Sanitarium, rare first editions and out of print books from Loma Linda University’s own Department of Archives and Special Collections, and vintage snake oil posters.

The exhibition is currently on display in the lobby of the Heritage Research Center located within the Vernier Radcliffe wing of the Del E. Webb Memorial Library

          Many of these medical devices were proven to be either ineffective or unsafe and seized by the courts. Some of the inventors of these gadgets faced criminal charges too. During the 1980s, the equipment on display was turned over to the care and supervision of Dr. William T. Jarvis, President and founder of the California Council Against Health Fraud. Jarvis was also a professor at Loma Linda University with dual appointments in the Schools of Medicine and Public Health, and a secondary appointment in the School of Dentistry. He authored numerous articles, mainly on consumer health fraud. He also co-authored The Health Robbers, the textbook Consumer Health: A Guide to Intelligent Decisions, and authored Quackery and You. Dr. Jarvis died in March 2016 at the age of 80.

          Those who wish to view the exhibit may do so for free! The items will be on display at the Heritage Research Center located within the Del E. Webb Memorial Library at the Loma Linda University campus from May 01 – September 29, 2017 during normal library hours.

Hacksaw Ridge

Doss's Army Service Uniform with his replacement Medal of Honor. These items were received in 2007 and will be on display in our department exhibit cases.

Doss’s Army Service Uniform with his replacement Medal of Honor. 

     Our department has been busy lately. We were invited to set up an exhibition at the advance private screening of the film, Hacksaw Ridge, hosted by Loma Linda University Health on November 3, 2016. The movie tells the true story of Pfc. Desmond T. Doss, a Seventh-day Adventist conscientious objector, who won the Congressional Medal of Honor for his heroic actions at the Maeda Escarpment during the Battle of Okinawa (Apr 1 – Jun 22, 1945), the largest and bloodiest battle of the war. Desmond Doss was credited with single-handedly saving 75 wounded soldiers off the escarpment over a 12-hour period under enemy fire, and was the first conscientious objector to win the Medal of Honor. In addition to the Medal of Honor, Doss was awarded two Purple Hearts and the Bronze Star.

Various certificates for Doss's heroic efforts.

Various certificates for Doss’s heroic efforts.

     In June of 2007, the collection was acquired as a donation from the Desmond Doss estate through the Georgia-Cumberland SDA Conference. Housed in approximately 60 archival boxes, the Desmond Doss Collection includes personal correspondence written to and from Doss, medals, certificates, uniforms, scrapbooks, memorabilia and more collected by Doss during his lifetime. Within the collection is a replacement Medal of Honor (one of two) that was given to Doss for his courageous and heroic efforts. The original medal awarded to Doss on October 12, 1945, was lost in 1969 during a visit to Okinawa. The medal was later recovered, but Doss had already requested this replacement medal. His original Medal of Honor was donated to the Charles H. Coolidge Medal of Honor Heritage Center in Chattanooga, Tennessee in 1990 by Desmond and wife Dorothy. However, we believe the bars and ribbons are originals.

     Shown are a few snapshots of items exhibited at the film premier. The department of Archives and Special Collections plans to create a larger exhibit highlighting Desmond Doss and his remarkable achievements. Check back soon for more information.

Helmet, knapsack and canteen of Desmond Doss.

Helmet, knapsack and canteen of Desmond Doss.

#ThrowBackThursday – The Nurse’s Cap

          The vocation of nursing has been around for centuries, but the official development of nursing as a career took off in the 19th Century. Florence Nightingale sometimes called “The Lady with the Lamp” for her effort of nursing British soldiers during the Crimean War, saw the need to care for the sick. She was instrumental in developing standards and techniques for nurses and helped design the uniform look. In particular, the nurse’s cap.

We have a collection of nursing uniforms, caps, and dresses which showcase different styles of nursing attire worn throughout the decades. This picture, circa 1907, is the first nursing class at the College of Medical Evangelist with baby Richard Edward Abbott.

Figure 01: We have a collection of nursing uniforms, caps, and dresses which showcase different styles of nursing attire worn throughout the decades. This picture, circa 1907, is the first nursing class at the College of Medical Evangelist with baby Richard Edward Abbott.

          The cap was based on the habit, as worn by Catholic nuns, to distinguish those women who worked in the service of caring for the sick. The nurse’s cap has undergone several changes throughout the years. Originally, the cap was more of a veil covering the head, but it later evolved into a white cap during the Victorian era, and later the form we see in figure 01.

          The nurse’s cap has also had a ceremonial purpose. For example, as seen in figure 02, the nurse’s cap was used in a ceremony for new nurses. The capping ceremony was established as a way to present a nurse’s cap to students who have completed school work prior to beginning hospital training. Over the course of time, the nurse’s cap has been phased out, mainly due to a concern of bacteria collecting in the cap. Also, with the increasing number of men in the nursing profession, the historical nurse’s uniform has gone away, being replaced by the ubiquitous scrubs and stethoscope.

A photograph of student nurses in uniforms performing the capping ceremony, which is part of the graduation ceremonies.

Figure 02: A photograph of student nurses in uniforms performing the capping ceremony, which is part of the graduation ceremonies.

          What started as a quick #ThowBackThursday, #TBT update for our department’s Facebook page, and a quest for knowledge, became an opportunity to highlight aspects of our collections. The History of Nursing Collection includes photographs of students and graduation ceremonies from the College of Medical Evangelists, actual nursing uniforms – including wool capes, aprons, dresses and caps – historical nursing texts and manuals, to rarely seen publications by Florence Nightingale. To see one of the nursing photographs and more, head on over to the Loma Linda University Photo Archive at:

http://archives.llu.edu/cdm/landingpage/collection/photodb

And:

http://archives.llu.edu/cdm/landingpage/collection/sn

You can also visit us in person, Monday through Thursday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.; Friday 8:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.

Modesty Never Hurts

Stephen Nelson Haskell [1833–1922] was an evangelist, missionary and editor in the Seventh-day Adventist Church who became one of the pioneers of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in the South Pacific

Stephen Nelson Haskell [1833–1922] was an evangelist, missionary and editor in the Seventh-day Adventist Church who became one of the pioneers of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in the South Pacific.

For more than 100 years, the Seventh-day Adventist Church has been conducting camp meetings. These formal meetings, held annually, are spiritual renewal gatherings for members of the church and their guests. The conference in each division plans a ten-day or weekend camp meeting filled with seminars and sermons that teach biblical principles, healthier lifestyles by practical living principles and more.

Planning a camp meeting has never been an easy task for those involved, and the 1876 camp meeting in Groveland, Massachusetts would be no exception. The camp site was located in a grove of oak and pines trees. Train tracks from the Boston and Maine railroad ran along one side of the grove. There was also a river nearby with the possibility of bringing visitors to the meeting. Elder Stephen N. Haskell [1833 – 1922] did not see transportation as a problem, but as an opportunity for the railroad to be hospitable to the General Conference of Seventh-day Adventist.

As time grew near, Elder Haskell made a list of special favors, which included free fare to and from the camp meeting. He hoped to get the railroad company to do these favors for the benefit of the meeting. Accompanying Haskell was minister, Asa T. Robinson [1850 – 1949]. The two men went to go see Mr. Ferber, president of the railroad company.

The list was given to Mr. Ferber and he later took it to his manager. “Gentleman, why don’t you ask for the world?” said the manager when he met with Haskell and Robinson. Joking Haskell responded, “Oh, we thought we would be a little modest.” At the end of the meeting the two men were granted use of the railroads during the conference. Shown below is the ticket that granted free return trip passage on the Boston and Maine R.R., signed by S. N. Haskell.

Attendees to the 1876 Groveland camp meeting were granted free passage by trains.

Attendees to the 1876 Groveland camp meeting were granted free passage by trains.

Ellen G. White made an appearance at the Groveland camp meeting on Sunday morning of August 27, 1876. She spoke on the subject of Christian temperance to the 20,000 in attendance. Eighteen trains ran each day, and each train was packed with camp attendees. The platform and steps were so full that the conductor had to climb on the roof in order to signal the engineer. The conductor reported that it would have taken twenty-five railroad cars to carry all the people who were waiting for a ride at the depot to the campground.

Gift of Commemorative Plates

                When staff arrived at work Monday morning, they found four beautiful porcelain commemorative plates waiting for them. A single piece of paper containing the name and address of who we believe to be the donors of the plates – George and Jeanne Wiesseman.

Possible donors, George and Jeanne Wiesseman

Possible doners of commemorative plates, George and Jeanne Wiesseman

            George graduated from the College of Medical Evangelists School of Medicine with an M.D. in 1947, and returned to get an M.M.S. in General Surgery in 1956. Jeanne earned not one, but five CME/LLU degrees over the years: one Bachelor of Science, three masters’ degrees, and one doctorate. Both George and Jeanne credit their Loma Linda University education as the foundation for their success. The couple, married for 70 years, have served God and humanity – George as an orthopedic surgeon, Jeanne as a medical technologist – in California, Georgia, Texas, Thailand and Vietnam, where they were at the time of the fall of Saigon.

The commemorative plates, lastest acquisition to the department of Archives and Special Collections

The commemorative plates, lastest acquisition to the department of Archives and Special Collections

         The four plates: The College of Medical Evangelists, formerly Loma Linda Hospital, now Nichol Hall; College of Medical Evangelists, Los Angeles; Loma Linda University Medical Center; and Battle Creek Sanitarium, Battle Creek, Mich., are beautiful porcelain plates commemorating Seventh-day Adventist medical education, and we are thrilled to be able to add them to our historic artifacts collection in the University Archives. We are pleased that the Wiesseman’s have shared these mementos with the University family and community.

Lori N. Curtis

Chair, Department of Archives and Special Collections

Heritage Research Center

William Ward Simpson Prophetic Chart

Simpson, William Ward, 1872-1907. [Chart]. Designed and Arranged by William Ward Simpson, Battle Creek, Mich. (Buffalo, N.Y.: Courier Co. (Litho Dpt.), n.d.).  Chromolithographed linen, 41 x 29 ½ in.

Simpson, William Ward, 1872-1907. [Chart]. Designed and Arranged by William Ward Simpson, Battle Creek, Mich. (Buffalo, N.Y.: Courier Co. (Litho Dpt.), n.d.). Chromolithographed linen, 41 x 29 ½ in.

      Last week, the Heritage Research Center was privileged to receive one of the prophetic charts created and produced by William Ward Simpson in the late 1890s or early 1900s. The chart was donated to Loma Linda University by Bruce McClay, a librarian with the Walla Walla University School of Nursing in Portland, Oregon.

     William Ward Simpson was born on August 1, 1872 in Brooklyn, NY. One of six children of William Ward Simpson Sr. and Anne Turner, William was the only one to survive early childhood. William converted to the Seventh-day Adventist faith in 1890. As a youth, William had worked at the Battle Creek Sanitarium and in the office of the Good Health publication. He completed an apprenticeship in the Review and Herald office in Battle Creek, where he was working at the time of his conversion. Not long after he informed the foreman of the press that he was going to quit his job so that he could spend his time preaching the Third Angel’s message. William married Nellie F. Ballenger on May 10, 1899 and was ordained as a minister on June 17 of that same year. Simpson spent the next eight years preaching to enthusiastic crowds throughout California and the Midwest using the large, colorful chart he produced to illustrate the Biblical prophecies in the Book of Daniel. Simpson also had large papier mache’ beasts made to resemble the beasts as described in the Book of Daniel and to be used in his evangelistic meetings which attracted crowds as large as 2,000 in Los Angeles in 1906. These beasts were given to Andrews University, where they reside in the Center for Adventist Research.

     Simpson died at the premature age of 35 on April 28, 1907, in Glendale, California.

In Memoriam…

      On July 16, 1915, ninety-nine years ago today, Mrs. Ellen G. White died. In honor of her life and memory, share your favorite Ellen White book, article or quote. There are hundreds to choose from! At the time of her death Ellen White’s lite…rary productions totaled approximately 100,000 pages in the form of: 24 books in current circulation, two book manuscripts ready for publication. 5,000 periodical articles in the journals of the church and more than 200 tracts and pamphlet, approximately 35,000 typewritten pages of manuscript documents and letters. Compilations made after her death from Ellen White’s writings bring the total number of books currently in print to more than 130. Next year in commemoration of the centenary of Ellen White’s death, the White Estate will release all of her unpublished writings on their site.
Program that was handed out at the funeral services for Ellen G. White.

Funeral Program for Ellen G. White. Loma Linda University, Dept. of Archives & Special Collections

Digitizing Church Records

Providing long-term and ease of access to records is one of our goals here at the Department of Archives and Special Collections. Did you know that digital records can be accessed from your home? Also a digital record gives you the ability to easily find only relevant information through key terms and subjects, opposed to searching a large cumbersome box for one piece of paper!

An early membership record and correspondence

An early membership record and correspondence

Lastly (and my personal favorite) having a digital record aids in preserving the integrity of the original record.  Papers that are brittle and acid burned can now be handled worry free – without looming glares and the infamous “white cotton gloves” from the reading room assistant on hand.

 One item of particular interest is the Merced Seventh-day Adventist Church Collection. The collection consists of early membership records, church clerk reports, quarterly reports and official papers dating 1907 to 1988. Through keyword searching, you can search for long lost relatives, chart the growth of churches, follow families as they move across the state, and country. In May 1907, Ellen G. White spoke at the California-Nevada Conference of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, held in the Merced, California area, and later writes about the only two Sabbath keeping families in Merced, one of which “lived some miles out of the city”[1] 

An excerpt from E.G. White

An excerpt from E.G. White

 These papers bestow the researcher a fascinating look into the history and inner workings of a church AND provide a sigh of relief to the assistant!

 Visit http://archives.llu.edu to see our digital archive!


 

[1] White, Ellen G. “Notes of Travel No. 7 – Merced Camp Meeting.” Review and Herald 37th ser. 84 (1907): 9. Print.

Pulpit from Campus Hill Church

Pulpit from Campus Hill Church

Pulpit from Campus Hill Church

On permanent display here at the Heritage Room is this solid pine wood pulpit from Campus Hill Church. The pulpit was added to our collection when the “Chapel” (as called by the early pioneer members) was town down in 1938. Many of the fixtures, such as windows and doors, were incorporated into homes built in Loma Linda. Ellen White spoke from this pulpit in April 1911 at the age of 83.