Modesty Never Hurts

Stephen Nelson Haskell [1833–1922] was an evangelist, missionary and editor in the Seventh-day Adventist Church who became one of the pioneers of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in the South Pacific

Stephen Nelson Haskell [1833–1922] was an evangelist, missionary and editor in the Seventh-day Adventist Church who became one of the pioneers of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in the South Pacific.

For more than 100 years, the Seventh-day Adventist Church has been conducting camp meetings. These formal meetings, held annually, are spiritual renewal gatherings for members of the church and their guests. The conference in each division plans a ten-day or weekend camp meeting filled with seminars and sermons that teach biblical principles, healthier lifestyles by practical living principles and more.

Planning a camp meeting has never been an easy task for those involved, and the 1876 camp meeting in Groveland, Massachusetts would be no exception. The camp site was located in a grove of oak and pines trees. Train tracks from the Boston and Maine railroad ran along one side of the grove. There was also a river nearby with the possibility of bringing visitors to the meeting. Elder Stephen N. Haskell [1833 – 1922] did not see transportation as a problem, but as an opportunity for the railroad to be hospitable to the General Conference of Seventh-day Adventist.

As time grew near, Elder Haskell made a list of special favors, which included free fare to and from the camp meeting. He hoped to get the railroad company to do these favors for the benefit of the meeting. Accompanying Haskell was minister, Asa T. Robinson [1850 – 1949]. The two men went to go see Mr. Ferber, president of the railroad company.

The list was given to Mr. Ferber and he later took it to his manager. “Gentleman, why don’t you ask for the world?” said the manager when he met with Haskell and Robinson. Joking Haskell responded, “Oh, we thought we would be a little modest.” At the end of the meeting the two men were granted use of the railroads during the conference. Shown below is the ticket that granted free return trip passage on the Boston and Maine R.R., signed by S. N. Haskell.

Attendees to the 1876 Groveland camp meeting were granted free passage by trains.

Attendees to the 1876 Groveland camp meeting were granted free passage by trains.

Ellen G. White made an appearance at the Groveland camp meeting on Sunday morning of August 27, 1876. She spoke on the subject of Christian temperance to the 20,000 in attendance. Eighteen trains ran each day, and each train was packed with camp attendees. The platform and steps were so full that the conductor had to climb on the roof in order to signal the engineer. The conductor reported that it would have taken twenty-five railroad cars to carry all the people who were waiting for a ride at the depot to the campground.

Rare Ellen G. White Photograph found a new home!

University Archivist and Chair of the Department of Archives and Special Collections, Lori N. Curtis, and her Assistant, Michael Olivarez holding the newly discover photograph

University Archivist and Chair of the Department of Archives and Special Collections, Lori N. Curtis, and her Assistant, Michael Olivarez holding the newly discover photograph

Recently, genealogy researcher, Jacqueline Leslie Trott-Bally, discover a candid photograph of Ellen G. White in the personal documents of her great-grandfather Dr. Leslie Trott. Dr. Trott was a prominent physician who died in 1966. The photograph, taken 1905, show Ellen White walking outdoors with her son Willie White and his wife, May. The photograph is the first new picture of Ellen White to turn up in decades. Only about 50 photographs of White are known to exist. It is unclear who took the photograph, but a likely candidate is the original owner, Harriet “Hattie” Allee Trott. Harriet, who worked as a registrar at the College of Medical Evangelists (now Loma Linda University) was an avid photographer. She later married Dr. Leslie Trott in 1921. Ms. Trott-Bally graciously donated the rare photograph to the Department of Archives and Special Collections at Loma Linda University on November 25, 2014. Pictured above is University Archivist and Chair of the Department of Archives and Special Collections, Lori N. Curtis, and her Assistant, Michael Olivarez with the photograph. The department plans to display the photograph in their vault, which can be viewed when researchers visit the Library or the White Estate branch office. The department would like to extend their sincere gratitude to Ms. Trott-Bally for her donation. Our collections have been enriched tremendously over the years through the generosity of individuals such as Ms. Trott-Bally.

Olsen Family Photograph Album

Just a peak at the Olsen Family Photograph Album

Just a peak at the Olsen Family Photograph Album

        The Olsen Family Photograph Album was acquired by the Department of Archives and Special Collections, Loma Linda University Library, in December of 2013 from Ken Sanders Rare Books in Salt Lake City, Utah. The staff member there who began researching the album, hoped that there was a connection between Uriah Smith, whose photograph was in the album, and Joseph Smith, founder of the Mormon Church. When his research revealed that Uriah Smith was not Mormon, but an important name in the history of the Seventh-day Adventist church, the album was offered to Loma Linda University for its Seventh-day Adventist historical collection. I was fortunate to have recently met the gentleman at an antiquarian book fair, and was pleased that he remembered me, Loma Linda University, and our Adventist history collections. The album is a perfect fit with our Adventist historical collections, which include other Olsen family collections.

         The album was a birthday present from Edward Gunder Olsen to his wife, Elizabeth “Lizzy” E. Olsen on July 24, 1890, for her 33rd birthday. The 79 photographs present, mostly carte de visité and cabinet cards, are of members of the Olsen extended family, and individuals active in the Seventh-day Adventist work in Scandinavia. This album, while documenting E. G. and Elizabeth Olsen’s stay in Norway and Denmark, also contains a photographic history of the evangelistic efforts of Seventh-day Adventist Church among the Scandinavians, in Europe and in America.

Lori N. Curtis

Chair, Department of Archives and Special Collections

This collection, as well as other fascinating collections, can be viewed in the comfort of your own home. Just visit, archives.llu.edu and see what you discover today!

Gift of Commemorative Plates

                When staff arrived at work Monday morning, they found four beautiful porcelain commemorative plates waiting for them. A single piece of paper containing the name and address of who we believe to be the donors of the plates – George and Jeanne Wiesseman.

Possible donors, George and Jeanne Wiesseman

Possible doners of commemorative plates, George and Jeanne Wiesseman

            George graduated from the College of Medical Evangelists School of Medicine with an M.D. in 1947, and returned to get an M.M.S. in General Surgery in 1956. Jeanne earned not one, but five CME/LLU degrees over the years: one Bachelor of Science, three masters’ degrees, and one doctorate. Both George and Jeanne credit their Loma Linda University education as the foundation for their success. The couple, married for 70 years, have served God and humanity – George as an orthopedic surgeon, Jeanne as a medical technologist – in California, Georgia, Texas, Thailand and Vietnam, where they were at the time of the fall of Saigon.

The commemorative plates, lastest acquisition to the department of Archives and Special Collections

The commemorative plates, lastest acquisition to the department of Archives and Special Collections

         The four plates: The College of Medical Evangelists, formerly Loma Linda Hospital, now Nichol Hall; College of Medical Evangelists, Los Angeles; Loma Linda University Medical Center; and Battle Creek Sanitarium, Battle Creek, Mich., are beautiful porcelain plates commemorating Seventh-day Adventist medical education, and we are thrilled to be able to add them to our historic artifacts collection in the University Archives. We are pleased that the Wiesseman’s have shared these mementos with the University family and community.

Lori N. Curtis

Chair, Department of Archives and Special Collections

Heritage Research Center

William Ward Simpson Prophetic Chart

Simpson, William Ward, 1872-1907. [Chart]. Designed and Arranged by William Ward Simpson, Battle Creek, Mich. (Buffalo, N.Y.: Courier Co. (Litho Dpt.), n.d.).  Chromolithographed linen, 41 x 29 ½ in.

Simpson, William Ward, 1872-1907. [Chart]. Designed and Arranged by William Ward Simpson, Battle Creek, Mich. (Buffalo, N.Y.: Courier Co. (Litho Dpt.), n.d.). Chromolithographed linen, 41 x 29 ½ in.

      Last week, the Heritage Research Center was privileged to receive one of the prophetic charts created and produced by William Ward Simpson in the late 1890s or early 1900s. The chart was donated to Loma Linda University by Bruce McClay, a librarian with the Walla Walla University School of Nursing in Portland, Oregon.

     William Ward Simpson was born on August 1, 1872 in Brooklyn, NY. One of six children of William Ward Simpson Sr. and Anne Turner, William was the only one to survive early childhood. William converted to the Seventh-day Adventist faith in 1890. As a youth, William had worked at the Battle Creek Sanitarium and in the office of the Good Health publication. He completed an apprenticeship in the Review and Herald office in Battle Creek, where he was working at the time of his conversion. Not long after he informed the foreman of the press that he was going to quit his job so that he could spend his time preaching the Third Angel’s message. William married Nellie F. Ballenger on May 10, 1899 and was ordained as a minister on June 17 of that same year. Simpson spent the next eight years preaching to enthusiastic crowds throughout California and the Midwest using the large, colorful chart he produced to illustrate the Biblical prophecies in the Book of Daniel. Simpson also had large papier mache’ beasts made to resemble the beasts as described in the Book of Daniel and to be used in his evangelistic meetings which attracted crowds as large as 2,000 in Los Angeles in 1906. These beasts were given to Andrews University, where they reside in the Center for Adventist Research.

     Simpson died at the premature age of 35 on April 28, 1907, in Glendale, California.

Digitizing Church Records

Providing long-term and ease of access to records is one of our goals here at the Department of Archives and Special Collections. Did you know that digital records can be accessed from your home? Also a digital record gives you the ability to easily find only relevant information through key terms and subjects, opposed to searching a large cumbersome box for one piece of paper!

An early membership record and correspondence

An early membership record and correspondence

Lastly (and my personal favorite) having a digital record aids in preserving the integrity of the original record.  Papers that are brittle and acid burned can now be handled worry free – without looming glares and the infamous “white cotton gloves” from the reading room assistant on hand.

 One item of particular interest is the Merced Seventh-day Adventist Church Collection. The collection consists of early membership records, church clerk reports, quarterly reports and official papers dating 1907 to 1988. Through keyword searching, you can search for long lost relatives, chart the growth of churches, follow families as they move across the state, and country. In May 1907, Ellen G. White spoke at the California-Nevada Conference of the Seventh-day Adventist Church, held in the Merced, California area, and later writes about the only two Sabbath keeping families in Merced, one of which “lived some miles out of the city”[1] 

An excerpt from E.G. White

An excerpt from E.G. White

 These papers bestow the researcher a fascinating look into the history and inner workings of a church AND provide a sigh of relief to the assistant!

 Visit http://archives.llu.edu to see our digital archive!


 

[1] White, Ellen G. “Notes of Travel No. 7 – Merced Camp Meeting.” Review and Herald 37th ser. 84 (1907): 9. Print.

Projector and Glass Slides Collection

UploadHave you ever heard of a Magic Lantern? The magic lantern is the forerunner of the modern slide projector. The first magic lantern was developed in the 17th century. The ones pictured here are early 20th century. There has been some debate about who the original inventor of the magic lantern is. The magic lantern has a bowl-shaped mirror in front of a light source that gathers light and projects it through a glass slide with an image scanned onto it. The light rays cross an “aperture” (which is an opening at the front of the apparatus), and hit a lens. The lens throws an enlarged picture of the original image from the slide onto a screen. The Department of Archives and Special Collections has a glass slide projector and more than 30,000 glass slides used by early Adventist evangelists in addition to those used by early Loma Linda University faculty.  After the closure of the American Medical Missionary College in 1910, the Loma Linda board decided to purchase the medial slides from Battle Creek Sanitarium and add them to the existing collection.

Glass Slide Convert 037