#ThrowBackThursday – The Nurse’s Cap

          The vocation of nursing has been around for centuries, but the official development of nursing as a career took off in the 19th Century. Florence Nightingale sometimes called “The Lady with the Lamp” for her effort of nursing British soldiers during the Crimean War, saw the need to care for the sick. She was instrumental in developing standards and techniques for nurses and helped design the uniform look. In particular, the nurse’s cap.

We have a collection of nursing uniforms, caps, and dresses which showcase different styles of nursing attire worn throughout the decades. This picture, circa 1907, is the first nursing class at the College of Medical Evangelist with baby Richard Edward Abbott.

Figure 01: We have a collection of nursing uniforms, caps, and dresses which showcase different styles of nursing attire worn throughout the decades. This picture, circa 1907, is the first nursing class at the College of Medical Evangelist with baby Richard Edward Abbott.

          The cap was based on the habit, as worn by Catholic nuns, to distinguish those women who worked in the service of caring for the sick. The nurse’s cap has undergone several changes throughout the years. Originally, the cap was more of a veil covering the head, but it later evolved into a white cap during the Victorian era, and later the form we see in figure 01.

          The nurse’s cap has also had a ceremonial purpose. For example, as seen in figure 02, the nurse’s cap was used in a ceremony for new nurses. The capping ceremony was established as a way to present a nurse’s cap to students who have completed school work prior to beginning hospital training. Over the course of time, the nurse’s cap has been phased out, mainly due to a concern of bacteria collecting in the cap. Also, with the increasing number of men in the nursing profession, the historical nurse’s uniform has gone away, being replaced by the ubiquitous scrubs and stethoscope.

A photograph of student nurses in uniforms performing the capping ceremony, which is part of the graduation ceremonies.

Figure 02: A photograph of student nurses in uniforms performing the capping ceremony, which is part of the graduation ceremonies.

          What started as a quick #ThowBackThursday, #TBT update for our department’s Facebook page, and a quest for knowledge, became an opportunity to highlight aspects of our collections. The History of Nursing Collection includes photographs of students and graduation ceremonies from the College of Medical Evangelists, actual nursing uniforms – including wool capes, aprons, dresses and caps – historical nursing texts and manuals, to rarely seen publications by Florence Nightingale. To see one of the nursing photographs and more, head on over to the Loma Linda University Photo Archive at:

http://archives.llu.edu/cdm/landingpage/collection/photodb

And:

http://archives.llu.edu/cdm/landingpage/collection/sn

You can also visit us in person, Monday through Thursday, 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.; Friday 8:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m.

We’re back!

After a two-year hiatus, we are finally back! Make sure to mark your calendars for Monday, February 29 to Friday, March 04, as we will be having our book sale. As always, we have a large selection of SDA books, periodicals and more. Please see the flyer for further details. We hope to see you there!

We're back! Mark your calendars for the book sale.

There is still time!

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Just a reminder there is still time to register and attend the upcoming Gift of Prophecy Symposium at Andrews University. Head on over to www.giftofprophecy2015.com to register for the early bird rate of $55.00. Hurry this offer ends on August 31. Sponsored by the Ellen G. White Estate, The Center for Adventist Research, the Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary, the Biblical Research Institute, and the General Conference Ministerial Association, this symposium will continue the commemoration of the centennial of Ellen White’s death and examine the contemporary relevance of the gift of prophecy in the post-modern world.

In the news…

ISBN: 9780816357970 | 256 pages | Pacific Press Publishing Association | Copyright 2015

ISBN: 9780816357970 | 256 pages | Pacific Press Publishing Association | Copyright 2015

Lots of fascinating things about Ellen G. White have been circulating around the office today and we want to keep you up to date on the following:

First and foremost, director of the Loma Linda University White Estate Branch office and School of Religion professor, Dr. Theodore N. Levterov, just published an article in the July 2015 edition of Adventist World magazine. The article, God’s Messenger: Growing Church, New Challenges, discusses when Ellen White was in California just before leaving to Europe. The article can be found by clicking here. [see page 22]

Second, Pacific Press Publishing Association just release a new book titled, Understanding Ellen White. Written by Merlin D. Burt, founding director of the integrated Center for Adventist Research at Andrews University; the book helps build a foundation for interpreting Ellen White’s experience with God and her ministry. The book can be purchased at any Adventist Book Center or online by clicking here.

And finally, have you visited https://egwwritings.org/ to read unreleased letters and manuscripts by Ellen G. White? Launched July 16, 2015 the collection features 50,000 pages of material dating 1845 to 1915 containing family letters, letters addressed to individuals and manuscript written for publication in book. The collection of materials can be found at the link above. Check it out today!

Ellen G. White Centennial Celebration

Celebrating the significance of Ellen G. White 100 years after her death.

Celebrating the significance of Ellen G. White 100 years after her death.

Ellen G. White [1827 – 1915] wore many hats during her lifetime. She was a mother, wife, church founder and prolific author (and for those who didn’t know, Robert F.  Harmon [1786-1866], Ellen White’s father, was a hat maker. :-) ).  During her life, she wrote more than 5,000 articles and penned 40 books. Today, June 16, 2015, on the centennial of her death, her writings are still being circulated and translated worldwide.  With that being said, the White Estate is proud to announce 50,000 unpublished pages of Ellen White’s writing which are now available online. Head on over to http://egwwritings.org and click on the link in the left-hand column that reads “Letters and Manuscripts”, researcher will find family letters, letters addressed to individuals and institutions, diary materials, and manuscripts written for publication in books and periodicals. See what you can discover today!

Ellen G. White Centennial Legacy Conference at Pacific Union College

Celebrating the significance of Ellen G. White 100 years after her death.

Celebrating the significance of Ellen G. White 100 years after her death.

This summer, Pacific Union College will host the Ellen G. White Centennial Legacy Conference  July 16-18, 2015.  The events will be held at Pacific Union College and at Elmshaven, White’s personal residence in Deer Park, and will feature a celebration of her historical significance and vibrant legacy in the areas of education, science and medicine, theology, and women’s leadership.

A special luncheon and lecture will be held at Elmshaven on July 16. Dr. Eric Anderson, director of the Walter C. Utt Center for Adventist History, will present a talk on  Ellen White, Elmshaven and the Napa Valley.

For more information on registration, schedule of sessions and meals and lodging, please visit : Ellen G. White Centennial Legacy Conference

Newspaper Columnist Reflects on Ellen White’s Contribution to Vegetarianism

The book, Counsels on Diet and Foods, published in 1938 after White’s death, compiles passages from her writings and teachings about food, and addresses her ideas on why people should eat less meat, or none at all.

The book, Counsels on Diet and Foods, published in 1938 after White’s death, compiles passages from her writings and teachings about food, and addresses her ideas on why people should eat less meat, or none at all.

The Portland Press Herald has published a profile on the lasting contributions of Maine native Ellen G. White to religion and health. The article is by freelance food writer Avery Yale Kamila, and it credits Mrs. White with being an influential early American advocate of vegetarianism. The article also cites Dr. Theodore Levterov, the Branch Office Director, who notes that “It is impossible to talk about vegetarianism in the 21st century without mentioning Seventh-day Adventists and Ellen G. White.” While the article is written primarily for a local audience in Maine, it is nevertheless a shining example of the wider cultural recognition of Ellen White’s continuing impact on contemporary life.

To read the full article, click here: http://www.pressherald.com/2015/05/13/vegetarian-kitchen-a-maine-woman-founded-a-church-and-converted-its-believers-to-vegetarianism/

Gift Of Prophecy Symposium 2015

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A major scholarly symposium entitled The Gift of Prophecy in Scripture and History will be held on October 15-18 on the campus of Andrews University. Sponsored by the Ellen G. White Estate, The Center for Adventist Research, the Seventh-day Adventist Theological Seminary, the Biblical Research Institute, and the General Conference Ministerial Association, this symposium will continue the commemoration of the centennial of Ellen White’s death and examine the contemporary relevance of the gift of prophecy in the post-modern world. The four-day conference will feature twenty internationally recognized speakers and launch a five-year, world-wide emphasis in the Seventh-day Adventist Church for understanding the gift of prophecy.

For more information or to register, please visit: www.GiftOfProphecy2015.org

New Publication Released!

Ellen White’s gift of prophecy has remained a controversial subject within and outside the Seventh-day Adventist denomination. This analysis provides an important historical context that illuminates the prophetic claims of Ellen White and the attempts of her denomination to find a more balanced and informed approach toward such a complex topic.

Ellen White’s gift of prophecy has remained a controversial subject within and outside the Seventh-day Adventist denomination. 

Hot off the press from Dr. Theodore N. Levterov, the Branch Office Director, is his first book: The Development of the Seventh-day Adventist Understanding of Ellen G. White’s Prophetic Gift: 1844-1889. The study is a publication of his dissertation, and it explores the process through which the early Seventh-day Adventists came to accept the prophetic gift of Ellen White. The analysis offers important historical context for those within and without the denomination who are seeking to better understand the prophetic claims of Mrs. White. The volume is published by Peter Lang Publishing and is available by clicking this link.

Dr. Levterov signing his newly published book.

Dr. Levterov signing his newly published book.

Modesty Never Hurts

Stephen Nelson Haskell [1833–1922] was an evangelist, missionary and editor in the Seventh-day Adventist Church who became one of the pioneers of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in the South Pacific

Stephen Nelson Haskell [1833–1922] was an evangelist, missionary and editor in the Seventh-day Adventist Church who became one of the pioneers of the Seventh-day Adventist Church in the South Pacific.

For more than 100 years, the Seventh-day Adventist Church has been conducting camp meetings. These formal meetings, held annually, are spiritual renewal gatherings for members of the church and their guests. The conference in each division plans a ten-day or weekend camp meeting filled with seminars and sermons that teach biblical principles, healthier lifestyles by practical living principles and more.

Planning a camp meeting has never been an easy task for those involved, and the 1876 camp meeting in Groveland, Massachusetts would be no exception. The camp site was located in a grove of oak and pines trees. Train tracks from the Boston and Maine railroad ran along one side of the grove. There was also a river nearby with the possibility of bringing visitors to the meeting. Elder Stephen N. Haskell [1833 – 1922] did not see transportation as a problem, but as an opportunity for the railroad to be hospitable to the General Conference of Seventh-day Adventist.

As time grew near, Elder Haskell made a list of special favors, which included free fare to and from the camp meeting. He hoped to get the railroad company to do these favors for the benefit of the meeting. Accompanying Haskell was minister, Asa T. Robinson [1850 – 1949]. The two men went to go see Mr. Ferber, president of the railroad company.

The list was given to Mr. Ferber and he later took it to his manager. “Gentleman, why don’t you ask for the world?” said the manager when he met with Haskell and Robinson. Joking Haskell responded, “Oh, we thought we would be a little modest.” At the end of the meeting the two men were granted use of the railroads during the conference. Shown below is the ticket that granted free return trip passage on the Boston and Maine R.R., signed by S. N. Haskell.

Attendees to the 1876 Groveland camp meeting were granted free passage by trains.

Attendees to the 1876 Groveland camp meeting were granted free passage by trains.

Ellen G. White made an appearance at the Groveland camp meeting on Sunday morning of August 27, 1876. She spoke on the subject of Christian temperance to the 20,000 in attendance. Eighteen trains ran each day, and each train was packed with camp attendees. The platform and steps were so full that the conductor had to climb on the roof in order to signal the engineer. The conductor reported that it would have taken twenty-five railroad cars to carry all the people who were waiting for a ride at the depot to the campground.