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University Catalog

 
Physical Therapy-AH

Physical Therapy--AH

M.S.R., D.P.T., D.Sc.

EDD ASHLEY, Chair, Department of Physical Therapy

HOWARD SULZLE, Associate Chair, Department of Physical Therapy

LAWRENCE E. CHINNOCK, Associate Chair, Program Director for Entry-Level Doctor of Physical Therapy

EVERETT B. LOHMAN III, Program Director for Postprofessional Master of Science in Rehabilitation, Postprofessional Doctor of Physical Therapy, and Postprofessional Doctor of Science

THERESA JOSEPH, Academic Coordinator of Clinical Education for Entry-Level Doctor of Physical Therapy Program

FACULTY

Carol J. Appleton

Skulpan Asavasopon

Edd Ashley

Lee S. Berk

Bruce D. Bradley

Gail Brennan-Polvoorde

Lawrence E. Chinnock

Tim K. Cordett

Nicceta Davis

Christine Eddow

Intithar S. Elias

Bonnie J. Forrester

Henry Garcia

Joseph Godges

Ronald A. Hershey

Patricia A. Hokama

Joyce W. Hopp

Susan M. Huffaker

Eric G. Johnson

Theresa Joseph

Robert F. Landel

Everett B. Lohman III

Helen H. Marshak

Bradford D. Martin

Jeannine Stuart Mendes

Todd Nelson

Steven D. Newton

Melvin A. Orser

Jerrold S. Petrofsky

Ronald M. Rea

Gail T. Rice

Ernest R. Schwab

Howard W. Sulzle

R. Wesley. Swen

James M. Syms

Desmyrna R. Taylor

Donna G. Thorpe

Antonio Valenzuela

William E. Walthall

Ardis E. Wazdatskey

Christine Wilson

Lily L. Young

Grenith J. Zimmerman

 

Physical therapists are highly-educated, licensed health care professionals who provide services to patients/clients who have impairments, disabilities, or changes in physical function and health status as a result of injury, disease, and other causes.

Physical therapists teach patients how to prevent or manage their condition so that they will achieve long-term health benefits. They examine each individual and develop a plan, using treatment techniques to promote the ability to move, reduce pain, restore function, and prevent disability. In addition, Physical Therapists work with individuals to prevent the loss of mobility before it occurs by developing fitness- and wellness-oriented programs for healthier and more active lifestyles.

Physical therapists provide care for people in a variety of settings, including hospitals, private practices, outpatient clinics, home health agencies, schools, sports and fitness facilities, work settings, and nursing homes. State licensure is required in each state in which a physical therapist practices

Within the Department of Physical Therapy, in addition to the Associate of Science degree (PTA) found in the previous section of the Catalog, the program options include:

  • post-professional Master of Science in Rehabilitation
  • entry-level Doctor of Physical Therapy
  • post-professional Doctor of Physical Therapy
  • post-professional Doctor of Science

Professional association

Students and graduates are eligible for membership in the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA). The objective of the association is to foster development and improvement of service and education. This organization grants student membership at a nominal cost to students of approved schools. The student is required to become a member of this association while in the program and is encouraged to read the journal and attend the APTA-sponsored meetings.

Professional registration

Satisfactory completion of the entry-level D.P.T. degree requirements qualifies the student to sit for all state licensure examinations. Information about the state registries of physical therapists can be obtained at the office of the department chair. All states require that a physical therapist pass the national qualifying examination for licensure to practice. California application form and fee are submitted to the Physical Therapy Board of California, 2005 Evergreen St., Suite 1350, Sacramento, CA 95815; Web site: <ptbc.ca.gov>.

Physical Therapy--M.S.R. (Postprofessional)

Admission

To be eligible for admission, the applicant must have earned a bachelor's degree in physical therapy from an accredited program or have the equivalent of a U.S. bachelor's degree in physical therapy. There is no GRE requirement for acceptance.

TOEFL score

A TOEFL score of 213 if computer generated or 80 if Internet based is required for international students. All international transcripts must be submitted to an approved evaluation service. The list of the three approved services can be obtained from the School of Allied Health Professions admissions office. Results of the evaluation are to be sent to this University directly from the evaluation center. Official international transcripts must be sent to the School of Allied Health Professions, directly from school to school, at the time of application.

Technology Requirement

Students are required to have an iPad for the courses in the orthopaedic and neurology tracks as well as for testing activities in all courses.  It is highly recommended that students have access to a personal computer (minimum: 800 MHz multimedia) with internet access (minimum: 56 kbps [connected at 44+ kbps]). A $50 technology fee is charged in year one.

The program

The postprofessional Master of Science in Rehabilitation (PP-MSR) degree is designed for individuals with a baccalaureate degree in physical therapy who wish to pursue advanced studies in their profession.

Practice credentials

To practice physical therapy in the United States, one must meet the criteria of the state in which s/he wishes to practice. Credentials are evaluated based on the applicable entry-level education. Postprofessional education cannot be used for this purpose.

Learning outcomes

In addition to the stated institutional learning outcomes, the PP-MSR student is expected to meet the following programmatic learning outcomes:

Outcome 1 Discovery. Students will demonstrate a commitment to discovery.
Outcome 2 Science. Students will use basic science knowledge to advance physical therapy practice.
Outcome 3 Global outreach. Students will provide physical therapy care to the larger world population.
Outcome 4 Clinical excellence. Students will provide advanced patient-specific physical therapy care.

{**2862;year=2014**}

Length of program

1 year (4 academic quarters)--based on full-time enrollment

Physical Therapy--D.P.T (Entry Level)

The program

The entry-level Doctor of Physical Therapy (D.P.T.) degree is for individuals who have no previous degree in physical therapy or who have an associate degree in the field of physical therapy. The D.P.T. degree curriculum is three years in length. A minimum G.P.A. of 3.2 is required for prerequisite course work. Individuals may enter the program with or without a bachelor's degree. Those who enter with a previous bachelor's degree will be granted the Doctor of Physical Therapy degree upon completion of the curriculum. Individuals who enter the program without a previous bachelor's degree will be granted a Bachelor of Science degree and a Doctor of Physical Therapy degree upon completion of the curriculum.  [Students entering the program in June 2018 will be required to have an earned Bachelor degree from a Regionally Accredited institution prior to starting the program.]

Accreditation

The entry-level Doctor of Physical Therapy Program at Loma Linda University is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE), 1111 North Fairfax Street, Alexandria, Virginia 22314; Telephone 703-706-3245; Email: accreditation@apta.org; website: http://www.capteonline.org.

Clinical experience

Supervised experience is obtained in a variety of settings and at different times during the course of study. First-year students complete a two-week practicum assignment during the Spring Quarter. Second-year students complete a four-week assignment following Spring Quarter. The major clinical assignments are during the third year. The student will be assigned a ten-week affiliation during the Summer Quarter, an eleven-week affiliation during the Winter Quarter, and a ten-week affiliation during the Spring Quarter.

All clinical assignments will be made by the academic coordinator of clinical education or a designate. Because of the limited number of local facilities available, assignments cannot be made on the basis of the student's family/marital status or personal preference. Although the department makes an effort to accommodate the student's preference, the student agrees to accept the clinical assignments made by the department at any of the affiliated facilities, whether local or out of state.

Student learning outcomes

Upon completion of the degree, graduates should be qualified to demonstrate:

  • Entry-level knowledge and clinical skills appropriate for safe and effective physical therapy practice.
  • Multicultural competence, i.e., compassion and respect during interactions with individuals from different ethnic and cultural backgrounds.
  • Clinical reasoning evidenced by the ability to think critically and integrate evidence-based practice into their clinical decision-making skill set.
  • Awareness and application of the ethical and legal parameters surrounding the profession of physical therapy.
  • Understanding of evidence-based clinical care utilizing collaborative relationships among the patient, physical therapist, and other health-care practitioners.
  • Effective verbal and nonverbal communication with instructors, classmates, and clinical personnel as needed to work effectively as a member of a health-care team.

Admission requirements

To be eligible for admission to the entry-level Doctor of Physical Therapy degree curriculum, the applicant must have a minimum G.P.A. of 3.2 and must have completed a minimum of 138 quarter units (92 semester units) at a regionally accredited college or university. Admission is a selective process. Criteria used include: G.P.A., completion of subject requirements, interview, and recommendations.

The minimum subject admission requirements are listed below. Individuals who already have an earned bachelor's degree in any field from a regionally accredited institution need to complete only the prerequisites denoted with two asterisks (**).

Note: Grades of C- and below are not transferable for credit.

Domain 1: Religion and Humanities (24 quarter/16 semester units, minimum)

Humanities (12 quarter/8 semester units minimum)

Credits in humanities must be selected from at least three of the following content areas, and one course must be at the upper division level.

Civilization/History
Fine arts
Literature
Modern language
Philosophy
Performing/Visual arts (not to exceed 4 quarter units)

Religion

An applicant who has attended a Seventh-day Adventist college or university is required to have taken 4 quarter units of religion from an Adventist institution for each full year of attendance at an Adventist college or university. Up to 12 quarter units may apply towards the 24 units required in Domain 1. If the applicant has not attended an Adventist institution, no religion units are required. In either case, however, the applicant must have completed 24 quarter/16 semester units in Domain 1: Humanities and Religion.

Domain 2: Scientific Inquiry and Analysis

Natural Sciences

The study of natural sciences must include at least one upper division course:

**Human anatomy and physiology with laboratory, complete sequence (preferred)
or
**General biology (complete sequence)

**One additional natural science course

**Statistics

**Select one of the following two options:

**Option one: General chemistry with laboratory (complete sequence)
and
a minimum of 6 quarter/4 semester units of any physics with laboratory

**Option two: General physics with laboratory (complete sequence)
and
a minimum of two academic terms of any sequenced chemistry with laboratory

** Medical terminology

Social Sciences (12 quarter /8 semester units, minimum)

The study of social sciences must include at least one upper division course:

**General psychology

**Human growth and development

Domain 3: Communication (9 quarter/6 semester units, minimum)

Freshman composition, complete sequence (must meet transfer requirements to four-year college or university)

**One course in basic communication skills (speech)

Domain 4: Health and Wellness (3 quarter/2 semester units, minimum)

Required:
Physical education (two physical activity courses)
Personal health education or nutrition course

Domain 5: Electives

To meet total requirements of 138 quarter/92 semester units

Students must have a minimum of 18 quarter/12 semester units of upper division course work.

No more than 105 quarter/70 semester units may be transferred from a community college.

Work/observation experience

A minimum of 80 hours of work /observation experience is required prior to beginning the degree. Of the 80 hours, a minimum of 20 hours must be in an inpatient physical therapy setting and a minimum of 20 hours must be in an outpatient physical therapy setting.

Technology requirement

Students are required to have an iPad for the courses in the orthopaedic and neurolgy tracks as well as for testing activities in all courses.  It is highly recommended that students have access to a personal computer (minimum: 800 MHz multimedia) with Internet access (minimum: 56 kbps [connected at 44+ kbps]).  A $50 technology fee is charged in year one and two.

 

Prerequisite changes for individuals entering the program in June 2016:

The only area that will have a change in June 2016 is in the “Natural Sciences.”  These changes pertain to individuals with or without an earned Bachelor degree.  The new requirements will be:

**Human Anatomy & Physiology, complete sequence with lab

**General Chemistry, complete sequence with lab

**General Physics, complete sequence with lab

**Statistics

**Two additional Biological Science courses with at least one at the upper division level

**Medical Terminology

 

Prerequisite changes for individuals entering the program in June 2018:

All applicants will need to have an earned Bachelor degree in any field from a Regionally Accredited institution prior to enrolling in the program.  In addition to having a Bachelor degree, the prerequisites for all applicants will be:

Human Anatomy & Physiology, complete sequence with lab

General Chemistry, complete sequence with lab

General Physics, complete sequence with lab

Statistics

Two additional Biological Science courses

Medical Terminology

General Psychology

Human Growth and Development

One course in oral communication skills

A minimum of 80 hours of work /observation experience is required prior to beginning the degree. Of the 80 hours, a minimum of 20 hours must be in an inpatient physical therapy setting and a minimum of 20 hours must be in an outpatient physical therapy setting.

 

TOEFL score

A TOEFL score of 213 if computer generated or 80 if Internet based is required for international students. All international transcripts, including high school, must be submitted to an approved evaluation service. The list of the three approved services can be obtained from the School of Allied Health Professions admissions office. Results of the evaluation are to be sent to this University directly from the evaluation center. Official international transcripts must be sent to the School of Allied Health Professions, directly from school to school, at the time of application.

{**2968;year=2015**}

Length of program

3 years (12 academic quarters)--full-time enrollment required

Physical Therapy--D.P.T. (Postprofessional) (45-unit track)

Admission

The postprofessional Doctor of Physical Therapy (PP-DPT) degree (45-unit track) is designed for the individual with a degree in physical therapy who wishes to pursue advanced studies in the profession. To be eligible for admission, the applicant must have earned a bachelor's degree in physical therapy from an accredited program or have the equivalent of a U.S. bachelor's degree in physical therapy and must have earned a master's degree. Upon evaluation of transcripts, additional corequisites may be required, and sequencing of courses may be modified. There is no GRE requirement for acceptance into this curriculum.

Technology Requirement

Students are required to have an iPad for the courses in the orthopaedic and neurology tracks as well as for testing activities in all courses.  It is highly recommended that students have access to a personal computer (minimum: 800 MHz multimedia) with Internet access (minimum: 56 k.b.p.s. [connected at 44+ k.b.p.s.]).  A $50 technology fee is charged in year one.

Student learning outcomes

In addition to the stated institutional learning outcomes, the PP-DPT degree (45-unit track) student is expected to meet the following programmatic learning outcomes:

Outcome 1 Teamwork. Students will demonstrate the ability to collaborate with others within and across disciplines.
Outcome 2 Discovery. Students will demonstrate a commitment to discovery.
Outcome 3 Science. Students will use basic science knowledge-related physical therapy practice.
Outcome 4 Global outreach. Students will provide physical therapy care to the larger world population.
Outcome 5 Clinical excellence. Students will provide advanced patient-specific physical therapy care.

Physical Therapy--D.P.T. (Postprofessional) (65-unit track)

Admission

The postprofessional Doctor of Physical Therapy (PP-DPT) degree (65-unit track) is designed for the individual with a bachelor's degree in physical therapy who wishes to pursue a clinical doctorate in the profession. To be eligible for admission, the applicant must have earned a bachelor's degree in physical therapy from an accredited program. Candidates from international programs must have their course work evaluated by an international evaluation service. Upon evaluation of transcripts, additional corequisites may be required; and sequencing of courses may be modified. There is no GRE requirement for acceptance into this program.

Technology Requirement

Students are required to have an iPad for the courses in the orthopaedic and neurology tracks as well as for testing activities in all courses.  It is highly recommended that students have access to a personal computer (minimum: 800 MHz multimedia) with Internet access (minimum: 56 k.b.p.s. [connected at 44+ k.b.p.s.]).  A $50 technology fee is charged in year one and two.

Student learning outcomes

In addition to the stated institutional learning outcomes, the PP-DPT (65-Unit Track) program student is expected to meet the following programmatic learning outcomes:

Outcome 1 Discovery. Students will demonstrate a commitment to discovery.
Outcome 2 Science. Students will use basic science knowledge-related physical therapy practice.
Outcome 3 Clinical excellence. Students will provide advanced patient-specific physical therapy care.
Outcome 4 Evidence-based practice. Students will select best practice and examination techniques based on scientific evidence.

Physical Therapy--D.Sc. (Postprofessional)

The Doctor of Science Program is a research-oriented doctoral degree designed for the physical therapist who wishes to pursue advanced studies in the area of education, research, basic science, and advanced clinical practice. To be eligible for admission, the applicant must have a Bachelor of Science degree in physical therapy earned from an accredited program or the equivalent of a U.S. bachelor's degree in physical therapy, and an earned master's degree. Upon evaluation of transcripts, additional corequisites may be required; and sequencing of courses may be modified. There is no GRE requirement for acceptance; however, successful completion of a comprehensive written examination is required in order to advance to candidacy. A written dissertation and a defense of the dissertation is required. At the completion of the curriculum, the diploma will be awarded by the School of Allied Health Professions in conjunction with the Faculty of Graduate Studies.

Technology Requirement

Students are required to have an iPad for the courses in the orthopaedic and neurology tracks as well as for testing activities in all courses.  It is highly recommended that students have access to a personal computer (minimum: 800 MHz multimedia) with Internet access (minimum: 56 k.b.p.s. [connected at 44+ k.b.p.s.]).  A $50 technology fee is charged in year one and two.

Student learning outcomes

In addition to the stated institutional learning outcomes, the D.Sc. degree student is expected to meet the following programmatic learning outcomes:

Outcome 1 Discovery. Students will demonstrate a commitment to discovery.
Outcome 2 Science. Students will use basic science knowledge to advance physical therapy practice.
Outcome 3 Global outreach. Students will provide physical therapy care and education to the larger world population.
Outcome 4 Clinical excellence. Students will provide advanced patient-specific physical therapy care.
Outcome 5 Teaching. Students will serve as mentors and educators to ignite the flame of discovery, knowledge, and critical thinking.

{**2949;2837;2851;year=2014**}

Length of Program

Post-professional D.P.T.--45-unit track--1 year (4 academic quarters)--based on full-time enrollment

Post-professional D.P.T.--65-unit track--2 years (6 academic quarters)--based on full-time enrollment

D.Sc.--3 years (12 academic quarters) + dissertation

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